Who Is Who?

At the end of the day how much do we really wear everything in our closet?These past couple of months with only dressing for home has shifted my thought to focusing on a seasonless and timeless wardrobe. I have slowly been moving in this direction but for some reason letting go of pieces that I have not worn in ages seems easier said then done.

As I work on editing my closet which is proving to be a painful process. My goal is to simplify my wardrobe for spring/summer with hopes that fall/winter will follow suit. I wish for less choice when it comes to dressing in the morning. Holding on to pieces that fit me well and that I feel good wearing is the name of the game.

Regardless of the season, basics for me include: tanks, tees, and denim. Each spring/summer new tanks and tees replace worn out old ones. The hunt for replacement tanks led me to discovering the Who Shirt Company.

Who Shirt Company is one of those brilliant concepts where you say to yourself why didn’t I think of that?!. A shirt with a built in shelf for your boobs that is not an athletic top. The Who designs shirts made from 100% interlock Supima® cotton with a soft supportive built-in bra. No fuss, no straps, no restrictions just pure freedom. As the company says “This is also about eliminating all the unnecessary details of your life, so you can focus on the things that matter. It’s about simply being who you are.”

Libby Haan is the clever lady behind Who Shirt Co. The company’s core values include giving back, zero waste, and made in America. Each shirt is named after a woman that continues to inspire. The Athenian owl is their icon watching over you as a reminder to embrace all that you are.

Take a peek at their website here if you are needed of some basics and also check out FABSCRAP if you are interested in zero waste.

Roasted Asparagus With A Fresh Spin

So delighted to discover the well known and just happens to one of my favorite NYC restaurants, ABC Kitchen shares some of their recipes through their website. Enjoy this simple spring side dish: Roasted Asparagus with Nicoise Olives and Basil

Colorful and bright and ready to roast

Ingredients:

2 pounds asparagus, trimmed and peeled

3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, plus more for serving

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

2 garlic cloves, julienned

½ cup Niçoise olives, pitted and halved

¼ cup sliced fresh basil leaves, plus more for garnish

Lemon wedges

Preheat the oven to 450F
Spread the asparagus in a single layer on a rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with the oil and season with a pinch each of salt and pepper. Toss and turn to evenly coat. Sprinkle the garlic, olives, and basil all over. Roast until the asparagus is crisp-tender and the basil wilts, about 8 minutes.
Drizzle with a little more oil, garnish with fresh basil, and serve hot with lemon wedges

ABC Kitchen recipe

A Bed Time Story

My sweet friend sent this video to me and it is worth sharing. The Great Realisation is a beautiful and touching video by British poet Tomos Roberts who posts online under the handle Probably Tom Foolery.

“a world of waste and wonder” “we’d forgotten to run” but then 2020″they remembered how to smile” the world we found” “and dream of tomorrow”

A Comforting Side Dish, Roasted Vegetables with A Caper Vinaigrette

For the past few weeks, I have been on a vegetable cooking journey with Yotam Ottolenghi’s cookbook, Plenty. A vegetarian cookbook that delivers flavors that will ignite your taste buds. This book is a visual piece of art. Beautiful food that captures your attention. You can easily pair Ottolenghi’s lovely dishes with a meat or fish if you are so inclined.

This recipe, I have made multiple times. It is a true favorite in my house. I love the simplicity of this recipe and how the flavors come alive. Leftovers taste even better the next day for lunch!

  • 4 parsnips (1½ lbs total)
  • 4 medium red onions
  • 2/3 olive oil
  • 4 thyme sprigs
  • 2 rosemary sprigs
  • 1 head garlic, halved horizontally
  • salt and black pepper
  • 2 medium sweet potatoes (1¼ lbs total)
  • 30 cherry tomatoes, halved
  • 2 tbsp lemon juice
  • 4 tbsp small capers (roughly chopped if large)
  • ½ tbsp maple syrup
  • ½ tsp Dijon mustard
  • 1 tbsp toasted sesame seeds (optional)
  1. Preheat the oven to 375°F. Peel the parsnips and cut into two or three segments, depending on their lengths. Then cut each piece lengthways into two or four. You want pieces roughly 2 inches long and ½-inch wide. Peel the onions and cut each into six wedges.
  2. Place the parsnips and onions in a large mixing bowl and add 1/3 cup of olive oil, the thyme, rosemary, garlic, 1 teaspoon salt and some pepper. Mix well and spread out in a large roasting pan. Roast for 20 minutes.
  3. While the parsnips are cooking, trim both ends of the sweet potatoes. Cut them (with their skins) in half, then each half into six wedges. Add the potatoes to the pan with the parsnips and onion and stir well. Return to the oven to roast for a further 40 to 50 minutes.
  4. When all the vegetables are cooked through and have taken on a golden color, stir in the halved tomatoes. Roast for 10 minutes more. Meanwhile, whisk together the lemon juice, capers, maple syrup, mustard, remaining 2 tablespoons of olive oil and ½ teaspoon salt.
  5. Pour the dressing over the roasted vegetables as soon as you take them out of the oven. Stir well, then taste and adjust the seasoning. Scatter the sesame seeds over the vegetables if using and serve at the table in the roasting pan.

A Brand To Admire: House Of Dagmar

No doubt the fashion industry must change its practices. But there is hope if more companies follow the footsteps of House Of Dagmar or at least take a page out of their book. In 2005, three sisters launched Dagmar, a Swedish contemporary label for women. Their standard is clear: high quality fabrics, high quality design, and high quality production. HOD takes sustainability seriously.

The sisters began measuring their carbon footprint in 2017. “We learned many things, for example that around only seven per cent of our fibres were sustainable when we started measuring. We also learned that using fibres that can be recycled or incinerated with energy recovery results in CO2 savings.” They don’t walk the talk. They are doing!

Back in 2017, 25% of Dagmar’s collections was sustainable and was a GOOD CHOICE. At the beginning of 2019, 50% of their collections were sustainable. For 2020 they hope to be at 90%! Dagmar introduced The GOOD CHOICE- label. A tag that promises the clothes it hangs on are made from ethically produced and environmentally friendly materials.

Where are they going with the goal?: Dagmar’s goal of becoming a climate neutral fashion brand by 2025, offering only 100% sustainable collections.

“For us, this is not only a trend but an important journey. It is an important part of who we are and what we do, it is a part of the Dagmar-DNA.”

I love transparency! I love choices to buy good! I’m a fan of Dagmar!

Last Night’s Beautiful Couscous Is Today’s Lunch

  • 1 cup couscous
  • ¾ cup boiling water or vegetable stock
  • 1 small onion, thinly sliced
  • 1 tbsp olive oil
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • ¼ tsp ground cumin
  • 1/3 cup chopped parsley
  • 1 cup chopped cilantro
  • 2 tbsp chopped tarragon
  • 2 tbsp chopped dill
  • 2 tbsp chopped mint
  • 6 tbsp olive oil
  • ½ cup unsalted pistachios, toasted and roughly chopped
  • 3 green onions, finely sliced
  • 1 fresh green chile, finely sliced
  • 1 ¼ cup arugula leaves, chopped
  • Place the couscous in a large bowl and cover with the boiling water or stock. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap and leave for 10 minutes.
  • Meanwhile, fry the onion in the olive oil on medium until golden and completely soft. Add the salt and cumin and mix well. Leave to cool slightly.
  • To make the herb paste, place all the ingredients in a food processor and blitz until smooth.
  •  Add the herb paste to the couscous and mix everything together well with a fork to fluff it up. Now add the cooked onion, the pistachios, green onions, green chile and arugula and gently mix. Serve at room temperature.

Sharing An Easy Pleated Face Mask Tutorial, No Sewing Required

A dear friend shared this link to a clever way for making an easy pleated face mask. Requirements: a handkerchief and two hair elastics. For those that can not sew like myself this is a brilliant approach. Much cuter than my tied bandana technique for my grocery store runs. It may not be a surgical mask but it will remind you to not touch your face and perhaps just add another barrier for self protection.

The website shows it step by step. Easy to follow! I have to say the tutorial I find soothing. Japanese Creations . Stay safe and healthy!